Thursday, March 16, 2017

Haiku. Do you?



         

            In an attempt to amuse and express myself on a second snow day, yesterday I posted haiku on Facebook about Storm Stella, and I invited others to do the same. As you surely remember from high school English class, a haiku consists of three lines. The first and third lines have five syllables each, while the middle line has seven syllables. I’m sure there are many more subtleties of themes and patterns, but for my snowbound purposes, I cared only about syllable count.

            However, just to be sure, I checked www.dictionary.com and learned “haiku” is already plural:

noun, plural haiku for 2.
1. a major form of Japanese verse, written in 17 syllables divided into 3 lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables, and employing highly evocative allusions and comparisons, often on the subject of nature or one of the seasons.
2. a poem written in this form.

            And look! “…often on the subject of nature or one of the seasons.” We nailed it.

            Enjoy our feeble offerings as cabin fever infects us all. The first three are mine.



Lovely, deadly snow
My frozen heart burns with hate
Won't you please melt soon?


This is not my street. But it could be.
Where cars once were parked,
Snowy mountains line my street.

When will the plow plow?


A frigid trek to
Lisa's Milltown Deli, where
Friendship warms my soul

         
Author friend and humorist Beth Brubaker contributed this:

This is not my cat.
And it will never be.


Pane of a window
Is much better during snow
Than pain of shov'ling!

         






      Family friendly author friend Carrie Anne Noble sent this:

Drifting flakes of snow
May you blow away to He(ck)

Melt on Satan's brow

            
       Nonconformist author friend Linda M. Au proved her frugality with words:

Snow?
No!
This is not my church. But I am a Baptist.

           Everyone else was too busy shoveling, binge-watching, plowing, sleeping, or
 measuring and photographing the snow to compose haiku.

            Today’s challenge? Snow themed limericks. Keep them clean, friends!

2 comments:

  1. Dreary cold snowing
    Wind blowing
    Winter's final Show

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope and pray it's Winter's final show.

      Delete